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Weird Kinds Of Full Moons

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We’ve just passed the Super Moon. But did you know it was also a Beaver Moon? Did you know each Moon has its own name? Thank the Native Americans for this custom. Here is the special name for each Full Moon:
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January: Wolf Moon

Native Americans gave this Moon its name for the wolf packs they heard howling on cold winter nights.
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February: Snow Moon

In much of North America, the snow falls most heavily in February.
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March: Worm Moon

This Full Moon is named for the season’s first appearance of earthworms – and happy robins!
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April: Pink Moon

The wild ground phlox announces Spring with a pink mist, or so it seems to appear atop the grass plains.
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May: Flower Moon

‘April flowers bring May flowers.’ It’s true, and it’s why Native Americans gave this Full Moon its name.
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June: Strawberry Moon

The strawberry is one of the earliest fruits to be harvested – hence this Moon’s name.
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July: Buck Moon

Why ‘buck moon’? Because July is the month when the young male deer starts getting his antlers.
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August: Sturgeon Moon

In August, on the Great Lakes, the sturgeon was easier to catch than during other months.
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September: Corn Moon

Also known as the Harvest Moon. We’re going to bet you can figure out how this month got its name, even if you’re a ‘city slicker.’
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October: Hunter’s Moon

Now comes time to begin storing meat for the long winter. Also known as the Blood Moon.
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November: Beaver Moon

The beaver supposedly had his busiest month of winter preparation in November.
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December: Cold Moon

Or the Long Night Moon. Because it’s cold outside and the nights are long!
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